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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 51 (some duplicates have been removed)
between israel and jordan. does that come to play with something you said. >> another excellent question. three home run questions from three freshmen. [laughter] the united states is very 0 supportive of efforts in the middle east to try to work out some of the challenges to the production and exporting of energy. and i think you know from having been in israel, israel has made some significant finds of natural gas off the coastline, and there's also the potential for such new energy sources off of cypress, off of lebanon, and we have been urging diplomatically that everybody work out their boundaries, that gets me back to one of the points i was making because there's often overlapping claimant -- -- claims and unless they're resolved stand in the way of the commercial exemployeation of whatever the reserves night be. it's in everyone's interest to try to make sure. everybody know where the boundaries are and people are able to let contracts that will be legally recognized in order to see what potential is available. similarly with respect to the pipeline, as you know, the pipeline fro
nuclear more than us. the people in saudi arabia, and egypt, jordan, so for that matter i think we will have to take action. and if the u.s. would decide to sit idly by and watch and to pray in order to take action, israel will have to do it by itself. it will not be easy. it will be harder. to deal with retaliation not only from iran. they will be nation's flying in from iran, from lebanon, hezbollah will join. hamas in gaza will send hundreds of missiles. but if we have to choose today between the option of allowing iran to become nuclear, to the option of fighting ourselves, i think the is a clear message what we will do. and the question is if will do with the u.s. or without the u.s., we are asking today. one of the main points of my book, i know many people here are involved with the middle east is the issue of two-state solution. for the last 20 years we hear about two-state solution. you must finish the conflict, the resolution will be a palestinian state. and president obama adopted this approach and she's calling upon us, the israelis to build a palestinian state and go b
is in washington with the details. >>> it is to put out here. jordan is a key u.s. ally in the middle east and israel peace partner and has been targeted before. the latest plot was more ambitious in the planning. jordan suspect had weapons aimed at inflicting the heaviest losses possible. the suspects are mill at that points and considered lengths to al-qaida and unclear to how close the militants were to carrying out the attacks. plot included anassinating western diplomats and shopping malls and cafes. and other areas where people from the west gather in aman. militants were arm ready with explosives and mortars and rifles. militants with ties to al-qaida carried out a terror attack and killing the u.s. ambassador and three others there. it was praised by the al-qaida leader who issued a call for more direct action. jordan's department outlined the intricate plot that the suspects planned to set off two decoy explosion before setting off a series of militia attacks and suicide bombers in the final phase they were to attack diplomatic missions . one question that arises from all of this
him is that he was the principal, secret negotiator of the israel/jordan peace treaty, and it's easy to forget that, that role, but it is important to understand how crucial that peace treaty is now as the region is so volatile. there's a bit of good news today, i'm told the new egyptian ambassador to israel came today to announce that israel -- that egypt will abide by the peace treaty, will abide by the peace treaty with israel, but we have relied on the peace treaty, israel has relied on it, and so have we, for many years. as haleh said, we watch developments in the middle east very closely here. the president of yemen came a few weeks ago to speak about a way forward for his country which is trying hard to become a strong ally in the fight against terrorism and has huge economic challenges. we just held the second of three meetings on how women are faring in the arab awakening. last month a former deputy secretary of state and ambassador tom pickering and other senior national security officials, military officers and experts with decades of middle east experience presented a rep
secret negotiator of the israel-jordan peace treaty. it is easy to forget that role. but it is important to understand how crucial that peace treaty is now as the area is so volatile. there's a bit of good news today -- the new egyptian ambassador to israel came today to announce that israel -- that egypt will abide by the peace treaty -- will abide by the peace treaty with israel. but we have relied on the peace treaty, israel has relied on it. and so have we, the peace treaty with jordan, for many years. and efraim halevy deserves enormous credit for that. as haleh said, we watched developments in the middle east very closely here. the president of the yemen came a few weeks ago to speak about a way forward for his country, which is trying hard to become a strong ally in the fight against terrorism, and has huge economic challenges. we just held the second of three meetings on how women are fairing in the arab awakening. last month, former deputy secretary of state and ambassador, tom pickering, and other national security officials, military officers and experts with decades of experi
and jordan river, a state connected by a highly developed infrastructure of roads and water pipelines. i'm not sure when the point of return was passed, seven years ago, my first visit to israel, it was plausible to speak of the palestinian state. now did -- now it does not. a democratic process, appointment of envoys searching for commonground, building on previous agreements like those arrived at under the prime minister don't have chance of success. there's no political majority in israel in favor of withdrawing from the territory and settlements israel would have to do to allow a genuinely economically viable palestinian state. benjamin netanyahu gave lip service to the idea, but people close to him said he would never offer the palestinians something he could accept. the west bank, areas a and b, cut off from the world without control of the air space, their water will not produce a viable state. what can the next president do to change this? the only intervention that could shake israel out of the current spiral would be if a president made clear where the united states sees this h
at the beginning of this yerar upon the initiative of jordan. we have also encouraged the expressed desires of several countries to contribute to efforts to break the cycle of deadlock. we have also undertaken an initiative to have favorable conditions. unfortunately, the result of all of these initiatives has been very negative. mr. president, ladies and gentlemen, there can only be one meeting of debt is a of -- meainaning of the government actions in our homeland. a permanent status agreement to end the conflict and achieve peace. when understanding leads to one conclusion. the isreali accepts the two state solution. the two state solution, namely the state of palestinian coexist with the state of israel, represents the spirit of this for a compromise in this declaration of principles signed 19 years ago. it is a compromise in which the palestinian people accepted to establish their state and only 22% of the territory of historic palestine. there is an intensification of isreali measures in the emptying the course -- emptying the oslo accord of their meaning. they're making it the extrem
egypt and jordan. we seek to forge peace with the palestinians. president abbas just spoke here. we will not solve our conflicts with libel speeches at the u.n. we have to sit together and negotiate together and reach a mutual compromise in which a palestinian state recognizes the one and only jewish state. [applause] israel wants to see middle east progress and peace. we want to see the three great legions that sprang forth from -- judaism, christianity, and is -- judaism, christianity, and is
of safe-haven from which to stage new attacks. when i've met with king abdallah of jordan we discussed the importance of continuing reform to move his country toward more democracy and prosperity. in all of these places and many others, the united states is helping the people of those nations chart their own destinies and realize the full measure of their own human dignity. dignity is a word that means many things in different cultures but speaks to something universal in all of us. one egyptian observed in the wake of the country's revolution freedom and dignity are more important than food and water. when you eat in humiliation you can't taste the food. dignity does not come from avenging perceived insults especially with violence that can never be justified. it comes from taking responsibility for one's self and one's community and if you look around world those countries focus on fostering growth rather than fomenting grievance of pulling ahead. building schools instead of burning them. investing in their people's creativity, not encouraging their rage, and powering women, not excl
and egypt and also the joint projects of energy resources in the middle east between israel and jordan and how that comes to play with everything you said. >> 3 home-run questions from three freshmen. [laughter] the united states is very supportive of efforts in the middle east to try to work out some of the challenges to the production and exporting of energy. and i think you know from having been in his real that israel has made some significant finds of natural gas off its coastline. potential forhe such new energy sources of cyprus, off the lead the non -- off of lebanon and we have been working diplomatically that everyone work out their boundaries. that is one of the points i was making. there's often overlapping claims and those overlapping claims, unless they are resolved, stand in the way of the commercial exploitation of what ever the reserves might be. so it is in everyone's interest to try to make sure that everybody knows where the boundaries are and people are then able to let contracts that legally recognized to see what potential is available. similarly, with respect to
as a capital is a nonstarter. there is now one state between the mediterranean and the jordan river, a state connected by highly-developed infrastructure of roads and water pipelines. i'm not sure when the point of return was passed. of seven years ago on my first visit to israel, it still seemed quite plausible to speak of a palestinian state. now it does not. so i believe any kind of normal diplomatic process -- appointment of a special envoy, searching for common ground, building on previous agreements such as those arrived at under prime minister olmert and prime minister barak -- don't have much chance of success. there's no political majority in israel in favor of withdrawing from the territory ask settlements israel would have to do to allow a genuinely economically-viable palestinian state. prime minister netanyahu, i know, has given lip service to the idea, but people close to him have said he would never offer the palestinians something he could accept. an archipelago stands on the west bank, areas a and b, cut off from the world without control of the air space, their water will n
ties with the sunni alignment of the sunni gulf states, egypt and jordan and the shia group of iran's syria and hezbollah was not easy especially as tension rose between the two groups. this was to be increasingly clear with the onset of the arab spring. when you look initially at russian concerns in the arab spring, it can spread to russia was efforts on the same problems as the arab states, autocratic government, widespread corruption and rising prices and indeed democracy demonstrators were shouting the revolutionary train stopped at the station in cairo, next stop moscow. the second concern, islam is my takeover and in a ending chaos and further inspire the islamists and north caucasus and increasingly and khe sanh as well. number three is oil and gas investments in the middle east could be jeopardized as well as the business and arms sales deals and number four when libya occurred, the russians i think that the major lesson purgative stained on the u.n. security council vote in the no-fly zone in bolivia thereby supporting the arab consensus and continuing the widened russian p
such as saudi arabia, uae and jordan, and in 2008 he added libya to the expanding arc of activity. putin's goals were fourfold. number one, demonstrate russia was again a major power in the middle east and the world. number two, gain -- for projects while selling sophisticated products like nuclear reactors and railway systems. number three, as the cost and difficulty of extracting russian oil and natural gas grew to gain joint ventures in oil and natural gas extraction with countries like saudi arabia, iran, uae, libya and iraq. and number four and certainly very important, to prevent the arab states from aiding the islamic resistance movements in the north caucuses that were beginning to spread through the rest of russia. but keeping good ties with the sunni alignment in egypt and jordan and the shia group of hezbollah was not easy, especially as tensions rose between the two groups. this was to be increasingly clear with the onset of the arab spring. now, when you look initially at russian concerns with the arab spring, a, it could spread to russia which suffered some of the same problems as
for a reason. this fire can quickly spread to turkey to jordan, to iraq. it is very dangerous. >> rose: may i ask this question, turning to another issue that is of great concern to the world, which is the success of negotiations between your government and the p-5 plus 1. where are you and do you believe there will be some success? >> we are hopeful that this will happen. this is why we are participating in the talks, in the negotiations. if there is no hope for success, then why would we even participate. however, we think that with technical and legal negotiations, we will not achieve anything. because our nuclear issue is not, is not legal and is not technical. you know about it because we have discussed it several times. >> rose: you believe it's a political question. >> yes t is clear t is clear that it's political. >> are you building a nuclear weapon? >> a nuclear weapon? for what, for what purpose, why would we do that? >> what would we use it for? >> you did not deny you are building a nuclear weapon. >> how many times should i repeat this opinions please, repeat it. please tell me
publicly saying, i'm a man of the left, in a speech with barbara jordan. >> host: did that hurt him? >> guest: no, because at that time he had stepped down as the anchor manin' 1981. he played mr. objective quite bell, and if you go to a doctor and are getting surgery you don't care if the doctor is a democrat or republican, but when he came out and voiced some disseptember own the vietnam war, it was the beginning of him editorializing, and today we see people in television who are editorializing all the time, and that's a slippery slope we're on now. and also, you see, with cronkite the berth of celebrities and television. where cronkite would go to a rally with senators and people running for president, everybody bum rushed them. they wanted to meet cop cite, not a senator from wisconsin. >> host: how would you describe him as a private person? >> guest: a lot of fun. he could not stand pompous people. at parties he would trunk a lot, sing old time songs, sometimes take part in a strange kind of strip tease act just to get people to crack up. but that's why -- i interviewed so ma
there are upheavals in places like jordan, bahrain or even saudi arabia. so i'm not sure we have the luxury of consistency. i think what both of them were saying was that the middle east is extraordinarily complex. governor romney said two interesting things i thought. one is that what the united states did in iraq and afghanistan cannot be a template for the future. thed idea we're going to continue to send hundreds of thousands of americans to remake other societies, that's clearly a nonstarter. and then he said -- i think his phrase was -- we can't kill ourselves out of this mess. there has to be something else dealing with extremism and the muslim and arab world other than simply traditional counterterrorism and drone attacks. there has to be something larger to try to encourage the evolution of these societies so essentially young men don't make the career choice of becoming terrorists. i think that's a big idea. it's easier to articulate than implement it but i think again to me it's a welcome add toyings to the debate. >> woodruff: what about those two points, nick burns and what did
of jordan last month, we discussed the importance of continuing reforms to move his country toward more democracy and prosperity. so in all of these placings, and many others, the united states is helping the people of those nations chart their own destinies and realize the full measure of their own human dignity. dignity is a word that means many things to different people in cultures. but it does speak to something universal in all of us, as one egyptian observed in the wake of the country's revolution, freedom and dignity are more important than food and water when you eat in humiliation, you can't taste the food. but dignity does not come from avenging perceived insult especially with violence that can never be justified. it comes from taking responsibility for one's self and community. if you look around the world today, those countries focus on fostering growth ran grievance are pulling ahead. building schools instead of burning them, investment in the peoples' creativity not encouraging their rage. empowering women not excluding them. opening their economies and societies to more
. >> it is spreading already. it is spreading to lebanon and jordan. >> the husband of violence. -- there has not been of violence in lebanon. at the same time, there is so many other places where you could have a fire began. -- which i think the russians are, here. >> i agree that russia is unlikely to help us in the united states. we have tried three times in the u.n.. cotton three vetoes in return. best case, maybe i was in china a few months ago. talking about, maybe they should concentrate on domestic problems, rather than having a domestic -- rather than having an aggressive domestic foreign policy. it is a possibility. i would give you my worst case, and it may be unfolding before our eyes. nato has guarantee turkey's borders. in case, what happened in just a week ago flares up -- more shelling. remember when i said in my presentation. he decides -- nonetheless, he might escalate the conflict the russians will not intervene. they said they -- their treaty with syria is not going to guarantee russian aid. we could see a nice war opening up with my then dragged into russia with the iranians. then
and medium enterprises in egypt, jordan, mori row koa, and yemen. partners work together to provide functional expertise and technical assistance to foster growth, improve job creation, and improve and create our jobs economic development. the overseas private investment corporation committed or improved more than in insurance and transportation, finance, ict and franchising as well as support for small and medium enterprises. now, well before the arab spring, of course, as you know, the u.s. was engaged in economic development in the region. in 2007, for example, the challenge corporation started a five year, $700 million compact with morocco to simulate economic growth in investments in projects that rangedded from small scale fisheries to financial services and enterprise support. the ncc remains an active player in the region with a recent $275 million compact with jordan and a planned program to address the main con straints of tunisia's economic growth. i could go on and talk about the fund created and the egyptian enterprise fund, but, in fact, our weakened efforts are not li
, threatening turkey, jordan, iraq. more and more militants are coming in who are not syrians who are taking over what was originally a much more pluralist liberal opposition. people are predicting up to a ten-year civil war. this is a humanitarian disaster. it is horrific morally and devastating to us strategically. we should -- the united states should act with the countries in the region to create a no-fly zone to protect people. there are lots of risks but the risks to nonaction are far, far greater. americans don't want to hear it. >> i will take a lot of persuading on the no-fly zone to convince me. david court wright. >> there is no plan for ending the war in afghanistan. the president says we'll be out by -- biden says yes for sure. they're planning to keep lots of troops there. the more important thing is how are we actually going to end the war in such a manner to prevent the killing from continuing? how do we work with the people of afghanistan so get a more accountable representative government that isn't just warlords and isn't taken over by the taliban? we need to be engaged in
was standing in terms of putting religion on the table. i made several interventions with jordan and italy. i believe that the conversation has begun. the first cut in going forward is doing what we are doing today and putting government, religion, and politics on the table. we are planting seeds for the future. i think we have made a lot of headway with strategic of dialogue. i would hope at some point, this panel and i could travel together so it is not just of a government. the government goes with congress. i think at some point in the future we might want to go together and begin to really show them a paradigm that has not been done before. we are on our way. >> for the invitation. [laughter] >> we have a lot of questions and the time is quickly marching on. i will ask you to run around a little bit. you might want to be on the center aisle so we can capture some of these questions before we leave at noon. >> i will make it really quick. one of the elements and i think is lacking in the discussion, we talk about the u.s. government and civil society. we do not talk much about the behavio
, still very dangerous. we're supporting monarchies in saudi arabia and jordan yet, but at the same time talking about democracies. if you spend any time in that region at all, first thing happens when you get off an airplane is some young arab will come up to you and say, i love america, you only support israel. so it's very hard to get traction in that part of the world when it comes to having an influence on them. >> before i get to a back and forth last night that resinated with either side depending on who you were supporting, what was your take away overall? >> well, barack obama clearly outmatched mitt romney on substance. no doubt about that. i also noticed a couple of minutes in, mitt romney was striking the right tone. the second debate his tone was all wrong for the first 20 minutes, 30 minutes, he was combative like he was in the republican primary. and while that worked well against rick perry, and newt gingrich and very well against primary opponents herman cain, it doesn't work well against the sitting president of the united states. last night his tone was right. he wasn'
. and when i met with king abdullah of jordan last month, we discussed continuing reforms to move his country towards more democracy and prosperity. so when all of these places and many others, the united states is helping the people of those nations chart their own destinies and realize the full measure of their own human dignity. dignity is a word that means many things to different people and cultures, but it does speak to something universal in all of us. as one egyptian observed in the wake of that country's revolution, freedom and dignity are more important than food and water. when you tease and humiliation, you can't taste the food. but dignity does not come from avenging perceived insults, especially with violence that can never be justified. they comes from taking responsibility for oneself and one's community. if you look around the world today, those countries focus on fostering growth, rather than fomenting grievance or pulling ahead. building schools instead of burning them, investing in their people's creativity, not encouraging their rage, empowered women, not excluding them.
, as one of the turning points in al qaeda's fortress was the attack on america in jordan in 2005, which killed almost entirely jordanians. lack of widespread coverage in the arab world. so i think in iraq people saw what al qaeda like regime would impose on the population. i think i ran this quite a lot of understanding of this. >> troop. i think about a month after that people were very upset. i mean, colleagues took out full-page ads in the papers announcing the attacks. it is a real backlash against that. but she see a lot of that appeared in a country where an attack is carried out, people usually supported tax outside their country. >> to talk about what happened in benghazi after the attack. >> and ghazi -- libya is very different because they are very supportive of the west for what they did in overthrowing gadhafi as opposed to other countries, where no one asked for american aid and got military support. but the point is i used to live in the admin. and in yemen, people were very supportive of attacks against the american military and american civilians. they were supportive of
in the middle east which has deep implication for jordan, for turkey, israel, our great ally and friend and you hear none of that sensitivity from mitt romney. it's a complicated world out there and we need a president who understands those complications and has the experience of making decisions about them. >> final comment? >> this is the most inexperienced candidate for president and vice president together. >> a one term governor with no foreign policy experience. >> one term governor and congressman that's been dealing with the budget. neither of whom have ever made a real decision about sending troops into war or about going into war or have gone into war themselves. >> i have to ask you a question where i understand -- >> you just heard -- i don't know if that was a loose cable or something else but we just lost the tail end of that interview there. it was a live interview between lawrence o'donnell and john kerry. there has been a lot of discussion about if hillary clinton steps down, whether john kerry would be positioned to be a secretary of state. we're going to go live to chris matt
this evening hosted by the ambassador of jordan, looking forward to that, and also, an early start tomorrow morning. u.s. views from ambassador jim smith followed by the arab-u.s. relations' view from the league of arab states which has a brand new ambassador here in washington, and then, of course, the palestinian future focusing on that as well as the gtc countries in yemen and the what has been done in terms of the department of state and others trying to double u.s. exports internationally and globally, but with special reference to the arab world. on top of business finance, human resource development, and iran, features here in the afternoon as well as does the view the of the u.s.-arab relationship from the arab media. i thank all of you for being here today. see you this evening and tomorrow. >> thank you. [applause] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> downsizing, watching it live, one of 10,000 homes they are trying to get done in the next four years over the course of the four years of may your being termed, these are houses never comin
, unquote. morocco, algeria, jordan have not experienced the arab spring, the recent developments have shown some changes. the political institution in some of the countries are in the process of transition with more participation. it's best if ambitious public spending plan. we have same legal system and procedures are being performed to the aspiration of the people and their yearning for a good government and transparency. now, let me turn to the american policies during the arab spring. two initiatives, these initiatives i don't think were a coincidence, but anyway they came up at the same time in 2011 and the other 12011. august 10, 2011, president obama ordered a division board. the president made the prevention of atrocities the key focus of his administration's foreign policy. this initiative aimed at civilians and holding perpetrators of atrocities accountable. the focus of this initiative is the area and libya. the other initiative come in the second initiative is the open government or airship, which announced in september 2011 but exacerbated in italy. it was launched by governmen
and the las vegas strip. we have problems with egypt and problems in syria. jordan is becoming destabilized. the fact of the matter is we have to be very careful to ensure that our ally, the most reliable ally we have and the only democracy in a very dangerous part of a world, has the tools they need to keep their people safe. >> thank you for the question. the biggest threat to israel today is iran with nuclear weapons. the second biggest threat to israel today is whether not the united states will stand behind them when they are threatened. there are very few differences between my opponent and me on foreign policy. if she wants to have a debate, she ought to have that debate with the president. what happened in egypt and libya, it took them weeks to decide it was a terrorist attack. i am concerned because israel needs our help. it will need our support and i stand behind them. >> ok. >> this is an issue that is very important to me. i have spent a critical time in middle east peace. when i disagreed with the president, i was the first one on either side of the aisle to express my differe
jordan in his monday speech. what he didn't talk about and that was a strategic partnership agreement that the administration has the go shade with the afghan government which will keep american soldiers in afghanistan until 2024. do you have a sense of what the minimum number of going forward? >> let me clarify a couple of things. there are more than a few administrative folks here who would say that was not the focal point on afghanistan. i was involved but i share the credit with many, many others who probably had more influence than i did. the first i would like to make about afghanistan and the big difference between mr. romney and mr. obama is that mr. obama said the deadline, period. i was in kabul in december of 2009 when mr. obama made that speech, and i was talking to isaf people, the people from the international force, you know the people who are out there getting shot at from other countries, not just our own. to a man and a woman, and there are women there, they have all almost took no notice of the surge statement. what they noticed was the deadline, and what our pakis
apprentice." why don't we introduce them. we've get bret michaels, claude yo jordan, gary busey, lisa renner, littlejohn, dee snider. >> right. >> look at dennis, are you? >> brandy, and we have stephen baldwin, trace atkins who has become a big monster in the music world because of trump. i want like 10%. mary lou, the greatest memory of them all and penn gillette. i can't get tickets to his shows in los angeles anymore. >> guys, welcome. good to have you here. i'm looking over the group. you're the only one who has won this thing, is that true in. >> this year is going to be insane competition, insane. the level is going to be crazy. >> why would you come back? isn't it a lose-lose situation for you? you've already won the thing >> i don't look at it like that. >> i agree with matt. >> you know, the other winners are going to be hosts with me. >> right. >> you're the only one on the show, and i was surprised you came back, but i think it's great. >> last time i was -- i was really sick, and this time i'm ready to come back, but being a lifelong diabetic, i'm ready. >> there's steven and tr
, jordan, which killed almost entirely jordanians attending a wedding. that got widespread coverage in the arab world. it's not just in iraq where people were sold what an al-qaeda-like regime would impose on the civilization. i think around the muslim world there was quite a lot of understanding of this. >> true. i was in aman i think about a month after that, and people were very upset. zarqawi's tribe disowned them, they took out page ads in the papers, full-page ads if the papers denouncing the attacks. there was a real backlash against that. you see a lot of that in a country where an attack is carried out, people usually support attacks outside the countries. >> well, they talk about benghazi, what happened in benghazi after the attack on the consulate. >> well, benghazi's very different, libya's very different because they're very supportive of the west for what they did in overthrowing gadhafi as opposed to other countries where no one asked for american aid, and no one got it, military support. but my point is, i was in, i used to live in yemen, and in yemen people were ver
several interventions with jordan and italy, and suddenly the conversation has begun. and so i think the first step in terms of going forward is doing we are doing today and begin to really put religion in government on the table. so the conversation has begun. we are planting seeds for the future but i think we have made a lot of headway with strategic dialogue. but i would hope at some point this panel and i can travel together so it's not just a government, so we have government goes with congress to a state department might go with congress, but i think at some point in future we might want to go together, so sold -- civil society and government and showed him a paradigm that has not been done before. so we are on our way. >> did you get a good shot? [laughter] >> we have a lot of questions, and time is quickly marching on. i'm going to ask you to run around. you might want to be in the center isle so we can capture the last equation and try to answer them all before we leave at noon. spent i'm from the state department. one of the things, element i think some black in the discus
, syrian/turkish border -- it's become not just for jordan or for israel or for iraq, it is real threat for regional security, and it might be one day like maybe afghanistan or yemen. it might even american interests. so we are not just blaming united states just because we are friends. it is real. i was there for maybe three times for the, you know, syrian/turkish border, and you can't imagine how much it's becoming a regional threat for the security region. the second thing i think united states has one responsibility. you're always talking about human rightses, supporting democracy, supporting kids' rights and women's rights. what about the syrians? now, i really was crying when i was seeing there are kids who didn't go to their schools for two years. and might be some of them, they might be terrorists. so my last comment is what is the -- [inaudible] if you are just going to stay in washington, -- [inaudible] i'm sure those will not be good news for united states. >> i think one of the things that we haven't heard at all here and yet should be uppermost in our minds is what went wro
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 51 (some duplicates have been removed)